Old House, New Home. What’s Your Next Move?

Renovation, restoring, extending, decorating of tired old houses is a passion for some, a nightmare for others. It’s not for the faint-hearted, and am I’m currently enjoying Old House New Home on Chanel 4 http://www.channel4.com/programmes/george-clarkes-old-house-new-home. The joy and sense of achievement after all your hard work ( and cash) when it’s finished for you to enjoy and live your life is a celebration indeed.  For some it’s a way onto the property ladder or an upgrade to a larger home, hoping for a cheaper purchase price, which will increase in value when completed – hopefully worth more than they’ve spent, and to live and enjoy their old house, new home. Some lenders will require the house to be habitable though, insisting on there being a bathroom and kitchen.

Of course there is always competition, winning these properties from other like minded people or property developers and builders. The latter looking for pure profit of course, and may renovate as quickly and cheaply as possible for a quick return. If the plot is large enough a developer is likely to demolish the existing house and build a larger one, two or possibly more (subject to planning consents).The latter option is not so easy for non builders or developers due to mortgage restrictions although there are some specialist companies who offer this type of lending, and information can be found on  http://www.buildstore.co.uk/   I personally dislike the waste of demolishing a structurally sound house, requiring work, but see the attraction on saving 20% on the VAT bill. It’s also not very green or ‘eco’, unless replacing with an ‘eco’ ‘passive’ house.

Extending our existing homes if possible has become more popular due to the high cost of moving – stamp duty, legal and agents fees, plus the extra on the purchase price for that extra bedroom, living space or bathroom.

Whichever way you decide to move, renovation project or extending, the ordinary home owner has a distinct disadvantage  – VAT. 20% is a high proportion of the budget.(Barn conversions and some renovation projects and building your own home are zero rated).  VAT is on fixtures, fittings and labour charges. If a dwelling has been empty for longer than two years or more you may be illegible for a reduced rate of 5%. For details go to https://www.homebuilding.co.uk/ To encourage and help ordinary folk, the Government should lower the VAT threshold on renovation projects. It’s greener too. Years ago, grants were available to help fund bathroom installations (if there wasn’t an inside bathroom), damp and woodworm treatments. Alas this help has long gone. Wouldn’t it be helpful to bring funding back for essentials, subject to certain criteria – income and length of residency, perhaps to assist those on lower incomes make a home of their own?

With the housing crisis, and lack of affordable homes especially in certain areas, a lot of young people with the dream of owning their own home is just that, a dream, despite working hard. There are Government schemes – Help to Buy ISA where the Government will top up your savings by 23% (up to £3000.00). The drawback being that the house you buy must have a purchase price of up to £250,00 .(up to £450,000 in London). Mmn. Try finding a house in the home counties for that price. The Help to Buy Mortgage Guarantee is a better deal, it lets you buy a home with a 5% deposit. The guarantee is to the mortgage provider, not you as a buyer. The purchase price is up to £600,00, which is more realistic in the high priced London area. However, you still have to prove you can afford to make the repayments of course, and with the average living salary, its still a tough call.

Hard earned cash pays their rent, living expenses and student loans, with little left to save for their deposit. House sharing in your twenties is not the same when in your thirties, especially if you want a family. This is now a major decision factor too, maybe putting your life ‘on hold’. You can’t make the home your own either, due to tenancy agreement restrictions.  Are we regressing to earlier decades, when complete families lived in a few rooms in a house shared with others? In 1918 the majority of households in England and Wales were rented, with just 1% socially, rising to 31% in 1981. Today the highest percentage of renters is in London, along with the highest property prices.

The newly built starter homes on big estates are, in some cases, poorly designed and cheaply built, with little more than a ‘postage stamp’ for a rear garden. There are great architects who could design  well planned homes, which could adapt to the changing needs of the occupants over the years  to extend if need be, i.e. the option for a loft conversion. The ‘Lifetime Homes’ concept was developed in the early 1990s’ by a group of experts including Habinteg Housing Association and the Joseph Rowntree Foundation to design homes to support the changing needs of the individuals and families at different stages of their lives. From raising children, coping with illness or reduced mobility.    http://www.lifetimehomes.org.uk/pages/revised-design-criteria.html

Shelter are currently running a campaign to celebrate 50 years, called ‘What does home mean to you? https://england.shelter.org.uk/ to raise funds and awareness of the housing crisis. So what does home mean to you?

House plan found on Google search, unfortunately without reference to the designer, for accreditation.

 

 

Renovation and Restoration of a 1930’s House – As the Dust Settles

As extensions begin to settle, and fresh plaster dries out, cracks annoyingly appear in your newly painted rooms and skirting boards will move slightly. One of the most time consuming things on a major renovation project is the snagging. How often have you gone round the house with a bowl of mixed filler, filling in accidental knocks (leave settlement cracks alone for at least six months – they will return or get bigger) odd scratches and holes, to find you’ve mixed up far too much filler. You dispose of the excess filler, only to discover more holes! These of course have to be sanded smooth and touched in with a little matching paint. We have an assortment of paint pots, brushes, filler and sandpaper stacked in one room specifically for this purpose. I will be very glad when these can be stored on shelves in the garage. It’s a good idea to keep the paint used in case of small minor repairs required at a later date.

Snagging goes hand in hand with what I term as ‘The Builders’ Clean’. This is a mega clean. Paint splashes on windows, doors and frames need to be removed with either a small amount of solvent (if UVPC frames) and scraped gently off glass with a razor blade to avoid scratching the glass. This is prior to actually cleaning the windows. The dust will continue to settle and reappear despite your best efforts for some time. However, it’s surprising what a huge improvement these small repairs and cleaning make to the finished house – it actually looks finished.

It wasn't as bad as Miss Havisham's house in Great Expectations

Too be honest, it wasn’t as bad a this!

Finally, we were ready to lay the carpets to the first floor bedrooms, landing and stairs. I chose a plain grey carpet for all these spaces, creating a cohesive look. Grey is a wonderful neutral colour which can be teamed successfully with many other colours, which enables individual character and style for each room. Once the carpets go down, you really feel that the house is almost finished. I was also very pleased to see the back of the dusty floorboards (despite the repeated vacuuming) and noisy stairs. The carpet came from a nationwide carpet shop, who use subcontract fitters. Although we had quite a large area requiring new gripper, underlay and carpet fitting, the rooms were void of furniture, so it made the job a lot easier and quicker. However, I was disappointed to discover that the fitters don’t dispose of the waste and cut offs. They simply bag it up for the customer to dispose of. I have a skip, but what about everyone else? Another trip to the tidy tip? It would be even worse if you had old carpets to remove prior to fitting the new.

The rooms looked much better having carpet, and would have looked amazing if the fitters had bothered to vacuum the carpets before rushing off. There was fluff everywhere, which was also floating around as ‘tumble weed’ downstairs. What happened to pride in your job, leaving looking as best you can? As I was vacuuming the carpet, I noticed in several places that the paint on the skirting board had been damaged by the carpet fitter’s tools. More snagging!

The Sonos System has been connected to the speakers – we have music! Needless to say that my husband and son have enjoyed ‘playing’ with the radio and music selections in different rooms. We have had to have boosters fitted in a few rooms though, due to the poor broad band service speeds available. BT are currently advertising fibre optic service on the television. Why are they advertising a service which is unavailable to so many people?

I have recently received a letter from the local council notifying me that I’m now liable for the Empty Home Council Tax Premium. The council explained that it is one of their priorities to increase the amount of available and affordable housing in the borough. Councillors have introduced this council tax premium for properties which have been unoccupied and unfurnished for two years or more to encourage empty homes back into use. They didn’t specify exactly how much more I had to pay, only that the increased charge would be 150% of full council tax for the property.

The house, when purchased was uninhabitable, and we received six months levy on council tax charges. During this time we had plans drawn up and submitted to the local council for planning permission (permission took twelve weeks) then we had to submit drawings to building control, which took another month, all before we could actually commence work, which took another six months before being habitable – just, (although not finished). Since the initial six month levy period, we have been paying the full council tax charges, despite being unable to move into the house, not until my present house has sold. I can understand and appreciate the councils intentions of encouraging occupancy of empty homes due to the housing shortage, but not all circumstances are the same. The extra council tax was certainly not in our budget or even contingency. Allow for it in your project!

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Useful category for filing purposes

Renovation and Restoration of a 1930’s House – The Great Interior Design Challenges

Buffering Symbol

Buffering – When will it end?

The image above via Google search is not of my new induction hob, but the infuriating buffering symbol we’re all familiar with.

The Open Reach engineer arrived on a re-scheduled appointment and connected the land line and internet connection. I explained my dilemma of broadband speed availability to service my requirements. He carried out a speed test for me – 1.70Mb. (However this was near the server, and my house has a lot of steel in it which does not help either). He explained that our connection came from the exchange which was 3500 metres away from my house. This connection has no fibre optic. There is a junction box cabinet 2000 metres from my home which does have fibre optic, which ideally I should be connected to. Unfortunately B.T. have not put in enough lines in to the junction cabinet to service everyone, and until they do we have to settle for poor service. So whichever service provider you choose, the internet speed will not be any faster.  Gigaclear an internet provider was awarded a £10m contract last year. This is the first time a company other than BT has been awarded funds from the “superfast extension programme”, which is cash from central and local government, overseen by the government’s Broadband Delivery UK. It’s time for  BT not to have the monopoly.  The village isn’t particularly rural either, and know that some towns have the same problem. It’s not just for entertainment value either, many people are working from home and a good service is a necessity. Interestingly, on Right Move http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale.html or Zoopla   http://www.zoopla.co.uk/for-sale/  the internet speed availability is stated on the listed properties and I have heard of cases whereby potential buyers were put off a property purely by the broad band speed, as this is a necessity to them. However, the company Right Move and Zoopla use for their broadband speed information is not always correct, so do your own research, and don’t be put off by a properties speed as listed on these sites.

I’m all for up-cycling, re-cycling and re-purposing furniture and objects where possible, and enjoyed watching   The Great Interior Design Challenge    http://www.sophieanddaniel.com/          http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04nj4d5/episodes/guide    re-purpose items given as part of the challenge to incorporate in their rooms. I was given a collection of odd items of furniture from a friend’s garage – a wooden bed head, metal bed parts and a small table. I discussed various options with my carpenter Tom, and to ensure that I wasn’t dismantling furniture of any value to incorporate into the boot room – shelf, boot storage and coat hangers and hooks.

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Bed head, and tables prior to re-purposing

A bracket for the shelf was made from the metal bed frame, a carved detailed piece of wood was used for the hooks to hang from. The table top and bed head have been re -designed for boot and shoe storage.

I bought a dressing table from my friend too, who was slowly clearing out her old family home. A mahogany veneer with a swivel mirror, glass top, original Bakelite knobs and carved detailing. There was a little damage in places caused by years of use. This type of furniture is currently out of vogue and therefore no one wants them. I needed a dressing table for the master bedroom, so painted the dressing table (including drawer interiors) with Annie Sloan ‘Paris Grey’ Chalk Paint.       http://www.anniesloan.com/annie-sloan-products/paints/chalk-paint.html   To enhance the carved detailing I applied a coat of dark wax diluted with a little white spirit, wiping away the excess. This also gave the dressing table the appearance of ‘antiqued’ or ‘aged’. The Bakelite knobs were put back on, and I now have a bespoke item of furniture. So glad this didn’t end up in landfill!

We found rolls of fabric in a cupboard, one of which was still wrapped the original paper, complete with sales label. Un- rolled, the fabric by Sanderson, who are celebrating 150 years this year.     https://www.sanderson-uk.com/shop/fabric/?act=ssocomplete    is still as good as new.  We still have the whole nine yards! The design is very 60’s/70’s and can’t presently find anywhere to reuse it. I’m open to offers!

 

We also discovered about two yards of 1970’s cotton dress fabric – cushion covers perhaps?

 

 

Renovation and Restoration of a 1930’s House – Don’t You Just Love Technology?

 

Sonas System image via Pinterest

Sonos System

It was suggested, prior to the first fix electrics to install a Sonos music system.  After much thought and discussion about going over our original budget, we decided it would be a good idea. TV and internet ports were also installed in some bedrooms as well as the living areas, the idea being that family members could use the internet independently to stream films, games etc.  Our electrician laid all the cables and the builders left gaps in the ceiling ready for the speakers. The mass of wires leading back to a cupboard where the system will be controlled from. The installers of the Sonos System wanted the house to be virtually dust free before fitting.

Ceiling Speaker

An unobtrusive ceiling speaker

Sounds good, and so far so good, until we came to install a phone line and broadband. An internet search of post code speeds and providers showed lots of options and costs too, including BT Infinity, Sky Fibre Unlimited, EE and TalkTalk. BT Infinity showed the estimated speed at 22.8 – 38Mb. As a current BT customer I organised the contract and booked in an installation date. However, when reading through the info received BT had estimated the broadband speed at 1Mb – 4Mb. This is a huge difference, especially when streaming films, downloading computer games and music. I questioned BT about the speed, and they explained that half the village did indeed have fibre optic cable, but my house is in the half that doesn’t; and they had no plans in the foreseeable future to install the other half. So we have all the technology wired in, but inadequate broad band service to actually run it all at the same time.

Broad Band Speeds for your area can be found in the internet

Broad Band speeds for our post code found on the Internet

A neighbour came by just by chance with some information about a company who provide a better broadband speed of up to 40Mb. He had just set up an account and had the system installed, due to his frustration with BT. This sounded promising.

The system works via EE’s 4G mobile network. The company will install an external antenna which connects to a 4G modem and allows for both wired and WIFI access through EE. It is also possible to move your current landline number to an internet based phone system, removing the need for a BT landline. The cost of this phone system is £2.50 a month line rental and 1.2p per minute for calls. A typical cost for the installation is £799.00, plus system interface and configuration charges plus plugs, plus plus….. But then we may save on call charges etc.

Two contracts are offered, either a 30 day rolling contract offering 15GB for £20.00 or 25GB for £30.00 per month. Or 24 month contract at £28.00 a month for 25 GB or 50GB at £55.00. Checking our current average monthly data usage (currently unlimited) this was insufficient for our needs. The maximum for a consumer available is 50GB a month, but we can add more at £15.00 for 10GB. The company didn’t specify whether that was £15.00 for each additional 10GB on top, but guessing it is. This makes a huge difference to the cost. If your usage comes within 50GB, then it’s sounds like a great system in rural and not so rural areas. Anywhere in fact BT haven’t bothered to install sufficient fibre optic cable, despite the Government promises!

So where does that leave us? Well, with BT, as there appears to be little else we can do.  Unfortunately, BT failed to turn up at the appointed time and date. Neither did they call or text to say they weren’t coming. For a communications company their communication skills are shocking. So back to the buffering and waiting for things to down load. Don’t you just love technology?

Selecting tiles for kitchen

‘Mood Board’ of tiles and work top

The work top in the kitchen has been installed by a local stone supplier, who have a huge range and choice of materials and colours to choose from. They also template and fit the work tops. I was lucky enough to find an off cut of Silestone which was suitable, and therefore a little cheaper. Silestone is a composite stone, offering hardwearing capabilities, and is less expensive than granite. Again shop around as prices vary enormously between suppliers. I have chosen to tile the splash back rather than have an upstand, to make the space more cohesive. I didn’t want an upstand with a tiled or glass backing behind the hob, which would break up the run above the work top.

 

 

Renovation and Restoration of a 1930’s House – Wind in the Willows

 

The wind in our willow and the only mole was ‘Mole’s Breath’ by Farrow and Ball.

We were very upset one morning looking down the garden. The whole of the lawn was covered with a fallen tree, battered by the wind from a storm the previous night. The tree had been a magnificent weeping willow and we installed a light especially highlight it when dark, with plans for a shaded seating area below its boughs.  Now all that remains is a broken stump – two thirds of the original size, not quite the ambience I had envisaged.  The willow had been key to the garden design. I really miss that tree.

Luckily the tree had not fallen on either our or our neighbours shed, however, it had to be cleared and removed as soon as possible so as not to damage the lawn further. Another huge job which took several days.  The tree had to be cut into manageable pieces to move it – logs for the multi-fuel stove, smaller twigs, branches and leaves. This was done in the relentless pouring rain. We had toyed about making a willow fence which was a nice idea but we really don’t have the time, know how or inclination.

A willow fence looks lovely in a garden

Making a willow fence from our pile of debris was beyond my caperbilities!

We hired a shredder so the smaller pieces could then be used as a mulch on the borders to help keep the weeds down. Its been so mild this winter they were continuing to sprout, along with the lawn. But, instead of raking the mulch over the borders my husband placed small neat piles and I now have what looks like termite mounds (or mole hills for that matter) all over the borders.

I had applied one coat of deep grey paint to a wall in the study, behind the original brick fireplace some months ago, prior to the wooden floor being laid.  Unfortunately it had dried in patches of lighter and darker tones, despite the wall having been prepped with a mist coat of paint over the bare dried plaster. I thought it was just a dodgy tin of paint although bought from a reputable company. My husband said it was the way I had painted it? –  I purchased another tin of exactly the same paint, and this time my husband painted the same wall. This also dried in patches. He applied a second coat, but with the same results. Dark at the edges where applied ‘cut in’ with a brush and around sockets, light where applied with a roller, and lighter still showing the outline of the plasterers mesh.

I abandoned this make of paint and purchased Farrow and Ball’s Mole’s Breath – being a similar colour to my original choice. http://www.farrow-ball.com/mole’s-breath//farrow-ball/fcp-product/100276    One coat of paint was applied and dried perfectly. Having already experienced problems with patchy and colour differentials in the master bedroom, I felt the company should be told about the problems with their product. After several weeks of email exchanges containing pictures, receipts of proof of purchase and batch numbers I received a refund for the two faulty tins of paint and a £5.00 gift voucher for my trouble. This hardly covers the time and expense of repeated wall painting. I just hope that the paint product problems will be investigated by the company concerned and rectified.

Farrow and Ball – Mole’s Breath dried uniformly and a great finish.

The wood flooring has now been laid to the ground floor. What a difference it has made to the whole house. Not only covering up dusty concrete floors, but means we can now fix the architraves and skirting boards to the walls. These can now be prepped for painting and a final coat of paint applied to the ground floor walls.

Although mild for the season, the underfloor heating has been switched on low to gradually acclimatise the wooden floor. This will swell and contact, as will some of the doors, which may need some adjustment.

Renovation Restoration a 1930’s House – Come On Baby Light My Fire

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Image from Bloglovin

 

Several months of trying to get the multi-fuel installers back to the house to complete the outside flue resulted in two ‘no shows’. They twice failed to turn up without contacting us; and once turned, up and then left after ten minutes explaining that they couldn’t do the job as our tower was not tall enough. I did wonder why they hadn’t bought their own tower or ladder with them to enable them to do the job.  I eventually managed to speak to them, and they explained that it would be best if we found someone else to finish the job. I had been dumped!

This posed two options, we either find another approved installer so we can get our HETAS certificate, which may be difficult because they hadn’t installed the first part of the multi-fuel stove, and may not want to certify someone else’s work.  Also they would be wary of us, as they would wonder why the installer had refused to return to finish the job. This I couldn’t explain. The other option would be to have the flue installed without a certificate and ask Building Control to come and inspect it and hopefully issue the certificate. However, if it failed the Building Control inspection which company would we return to rectify installation problems? We also had to get our flue returned from the original installers which was purchased by us months ago. Luckily, we found a great company who were prepared to complete the installation of the outside flue, (reclaimed from the original company) and issue a certificate. Interestingly they only needed a ladder to finish the job!

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The outside flue, now completed

 

The utility and boot room floors have now been laid with tiles resembling wooden floor boards. These are very popular at the moment and the choice of colours, textures and meterage costs are numerous. We purchased our tiles from a local tile merchant Acorn Tiles. They take time in planning the layout prior to laying, but makes the actual laying a lot easier, especially if using fast set adhesive. I have used grey grout to blend with the tiles. Fired Earth  http://www.firedearth.com/tiles/range/newlyn/mode/grid  also have a selection, and are surprisingly close in price of Topps Tiles, which one would imagine being cheaper.

The back splash has also been tiled with ‘subway’ or ‘metro’ tiles laid in brick style and grey grout used in between.

The wooden and glass partitions were fixed in place without the safety glass, and have been stained along with the wooden beading for fixing the glass for ease of application. The glass was then fixed in place, fixing holes filled and a light sanding all over. The partitions then had another coat of stain applied. Despite not being metal ‘Crittal’ style as originally planned, we got a great result at a fraction of the cost.

After much research we finally chose the engineered wood flooring. It’s a light oak veneer with a matt lacquered finish. The company, Posh Flooring  https://www.poshflooring.co.uk/engineered-wood-flooring/oak  were very helpful, efficient and offered advice on the underlay and installation. Delivery was two to three days and the wood had to be laid flat for at least a week prior to laying to acclimatise. Due to the amount needed, we ordered half what was  required and sufficient for two rooms for ease of laying and space. A vapour barrier is laid down first on the floor and then the wood laid on top. Some flooring systems are clicked together and others are glued. It is important to leave a 10mm gap around the edges of the room to allow for expansion. The wood will expand and contract, and if you don’t leave a gap the floor will buckle and in some cases need relaying. This gap will be hidden by skirting boards, or if a retro fit by wooden beading.

 

 

 

 

 

Renovation and Restoration of a 1930’s House (14) Behind the Front Facade

The windows being installed

The windows being installed

When undertaking a renovation project it is advisable not to have any other major events going on in your life at the same time. However, life is rarely that simple and we have been busy these last few months heavily involved with our daughter’s wedding, dealing with an elderly parent with failing health and working on the house. Something had to give, hence my time for blogging. Time to bring it back up to speed!

From the front of the house it still looks pretty much like a building site. Safety fencing still in place, a bright blue portaloo sits next to a pile of debris waiting for a ‘grab’ lorry to remove it and a rather full skip.The house, although now complete with new windows and front door still awaits the render to be painted, the roofer to tile the garage roof and a porch to be built. Most of the activity has been taking place inside and to the rear.

I had wanted to renovate the original front door, but was persuaded to opt for a similar design in a composite material in French Grey  due to security and draughts. It was pointed out that what was the point of energy efficient windows with a draughty front door, the previous owner had hung a very heavy curtain in front of the door, so I relented. We are pleased with the new windows, despite our compromise on material. These were put installed  in stages, the sloping glass roof causing the most grief, due to fixing the glass to a steel beam. The sloping rear roof was finished off with a water proof fibre glass resin prior to the installation of the roof lantern.The seven-metre-wide bi-fold doors which open fully across the rear of dining / day room onto the garden are amazing. We are now fully secure and in the dry.

New window and door openings have been made where necessary and old openings either blocked up or adjusted in size in the existing house. The ceilings have been removed due to their poor state of repair. Partition timber frames to form new walls have been built and the electrician has finished his first fix. We did our own electrical drawings for the electrician and provided a key to the symbols so he knew exactly what he was quoting on. This is time consuming, but well worth the effort. Thinking about where you want your plug sockets for lamps etc. means knowing your furniture placement. Light switches too have to be placed for ease of use, and whether they need to be one way, two way or more. Do you want them dimmable?  It’s actually quite difficult as one often takes light switches for granted, until it’s put in the wrong place and plastered over! Lighting circuits for layered lighting, for task (bright lights for cleaning etc.), ambient (lamps ) which create a warmer, cosier atmosphere, or specialist lights to high light a feature or art work. It’s also worth discussing your plan with your electrician because often they will come up with ideas and suggestions. We wanted LED lights for energy efficiency and nickel plated ‘toggle’ switches. Although more expensive than white plastic, it’s the small details which make the difference to a house. I chose a matching nickle plate finish for the original door handles, which have come up beautifully.

I would advise where possible, to walk round the property with your electrician and electrical drawing close to the completion of the first fix to ensure that everything is where is should be, and to make any necessary changes before the plaster board walls and ceilings are fixed in place and plastered.  The electrician also suggested a media system with ceiling speakers. This sounded expensive. We researched various systems and options and makes. The Sonas System appeared to be a recommended system. We received a quote from a recommended company and asked him to quote for his extra wiring work involved. It was approximately £5k for the total package, including outside speakers for when entertaining. We oomed and arhed and looked at our original budget to see where and if economies could be made elsewhere. That’s quite a lot of economies to make! After much deliberation we decided to have the system installed and probably take us over budget, as it was better to install it now than a retro fit later.

The first fix plumbing, including the insulation and underfloor heating to the new sitting room, dining/day room, kitchen and utility room has been laid and the floors have been screeded. Unfortunately, I wasn’t on site this day and  the new screed floor level is flush with the original wooden floor in the hall and original sitting room which I wanted to keep and sand and re-finish. This cannot now be done because by the time the new flooring finish is laid over the screed one will end up with a marked floor level difference.

All the plumbing pipes (unconnected) and electrical wires (not live) have been bought out of the side of the house ready to be connected. This is because the new boiler/mud room has yet to be built. This is being built later to enable the digger to have access to the rear for the remainder of the terrace to be completed.

The problem with the slightly differing floor levels upstairs from the existing house into the extension were rectified by lifting some of the original floorboards and planing the joists slightly at and angle to meet the new floor level. The boards were replaced, and now there is no noticeable difference to the levels. Unfortunately this will not resolve the floor level difference on the ground floor.

When writing retrospectively it sounds very quick and easy, but as we all know it takes time, planning and dealing with compromises and sometimes set backs.

The new render on the extension being stabilised prior to painting

The new render on the extension being stabilised prior to painting