Adding Character to Your Home

 

Inject your personality, style and soul into your home and garden, not by sourcing everything from one high street shop. Your home will end up looking like a show home, far too contrived and bland. Whether you’re preferred taste is Retro, Shabby Chic, Vintage, Industrial, contemporary or even a mixture of styles creating an eclectic, individual home. By mixing it up a bit you’re creating a home which reflects you, and enhances your home. Take time to enjoy gathering ‘loved’ items. Homes and gardens evolve over time.

Selection of elecltic Interiors for every room

Eclectic interior ideas

If you’re looking for an unusual or particular item of furniture, lighting or accessories to add personality to your home or garden, the Three Wise Monkeys a vintage and arts emporium at The Saddlery, Woodcock Hill, St Albans AL4 9HJ   https://threewisemonkeysemporium.wordpress.com/ is the place to visit. Open Tuesday to Saturday 10 am to 4 pm and Sunday 11am to 4 pm. Enjoy a morning coffee, a light lunch or afternoon tea in the newly opened vintage tea room and have a wander around two floors, packed with unusual items. Some will revoke memories of childhood ( scary, as some of us realize that we, too are vintage!), and some made by local artisans and crafts people, and a florist too, Flowers by Catherine.

 

A few pieces of furniture have been ‘upcycled’ into bespoke one-off  items, which could transform a room. Images show pieces by Carmel of Piece Unique and by me Sarah Maidment Interiors. We both take commissions  if you have your own item of furniture which you’d like customising.

 

You will also find Kelim rugs, cushions, and  stools and chairs upholstered in gorgeous Kelim rugs from Rug Addiction https://www.rugaddiction.co.uk/ . Other chairs re-upholstered, homemade cushions and artwork to grace your walls.

Kelim rugs, cushions and upholstered furniture

An array of Kelim rugs, cushions and upholstered furniture by Rug Addiction

If vintage clothing is your passion, Little Viking  https://www.littlevikingvintage.com have an array of dresses, jackets, shoes and bags for all. ‘Oh Sew Vintage’ for handmade dresses for all occasions.

 

You will also find every conceivable Doc Martin design boot you could ever wish for.

Selection of Doc Martin Boots, vintage heaters and lamp

Doc Martin boots, vintage heaters and lighting

Vintage books, comics, and  postcards can be found for collectors and unusual hand-made jewellery by local artisans.

 

Modern works of art and photography adorn the walls. This stunning picture of Nelson Mandela (below) taken by the photographer Greg Bartley would look amazing gracing the wall of a large room.

 

Limited edition framed photograph of Nelson Mandela by Greg Bartley

Visually stunning photograph of Nelson Mandela by Greg Bartley

IMG_6804Come and say ‘hello’ and meet Colin the resident ‘horse’ .

Fake horse called Colin

Colin, a reminder of the barns former life as a saddlery and stables

Renovation and Restoration of a 1930’s House Before and After Pictures

I have now compiled ‘before and after’ pictures, with the occasional ‘during’ photo (remember it always gets worse before it gets better) which I hope you’ll enjoy and give you momentum to commence or  finish your projects.

The renovation and restoration of a 1930’s house is finished! Are you ever finished in a home? Probably not.

Front Elevation

Before – Sad and neglected                                        After – Restored and extended

Hall

Before - The original 1930s' entrance hall prior to renovations.

Before – The original front entrance hall prior to renovations.

Original 1930's entrance hall

Before – The original hall was dark and poky.

Acro props before steel beam is installed

During an internal hall wall removal.

 

After - The finished entrance hall in a 1930's house

After – The completed entrance hall

Sitting Room

Before - The sitting room with the original 1930's brick fireplace.

Before – The sitting room with the original 1930s’ brick fireplace.

After - The original 1930's brick fireplace cleaned up

After – The original 1930’s brick fireplace was retained, so too were the original Crittal French doors.

Before Original 1930's sitting room complete with Crittal French doors and brick fireplace

Before – A 1930’s sitting room with original Crittal French doors and brick fireplace.

Kitchen

Before - The original 1930's dining room

Before – The original 1930’s dining room

During - The wall dividing the kitchen and dining room has been removed.

The dividing wall between the kitchen and dining room has been removed, to be re-positioned.

After - the completed new kitchen

After – The completed kitchen

After - Kitchen with island and glass partition wall and door to hall.

After – Kitchen with glass partition and door to hall. Original servants bell box is re-hung – shame no staff though!

Open plan kitchen/diner/day room with bi-fold doors onto garden.

View into dining/ day room area from kitchen

Before- original 1930s' dining room

Before- the original dining room prior extension and renovation work – damp wall is now where clock is hung.

Living Room

Rear Footings 3rd feb 2015

Before – Laying the foundations

Painted Stove and Fireplace

During – Marking the wall for the multi-fuel stove

Trescotte Sitting Room Afer 073

After – The finished sitting room

Family Bathroom

Before- A tired and dated bedroom                         After – A family bathroom

Master Bedroom

Master Bedroom during construction

The first fix electrics in the master bedroom

After - Large master bedroom with Heals four poster bed

After – The finished master bedroom

master bedroom with four poster bed from Heals

After – The large master bedroom complete with a four-poster bed from Heals.

The Loo

Before with original cistern          After – Re-sited and restored cistern

Guest Bedroom

Originally a landing with airing cupboard, bathroom with separate loo. Now a guest bedroom, painted in ‘Setting Plaster’ Farrow and Ball http://www.farrow-ball.com/setting%20plaster/colours/farrow-ball/fcp-product/100231

Rear Elevation

Before – An overgrown garden                           Waiting to mature!

However carefully one plans either a renovation or restoration project, it rarely comes in on budget – it’s usually over budget. This is not just because of unforeseen problems like discovering structural problems once the work has commenced, it can due to adding a few extra plug sockets here and there (it all adds up) or choosing high specification kitchen, bathrooms and fittings. Usually it’s because we’ve under estimated the basic build/renovation costs – raw materials labour plus VAT.  Comparing your projected budget spread sheet to the actual costs spreadsheet, helps analyse where you under budgeted or over spent.

Did we go over budget? Yes, we knew we’d go over budget when we decided to install the Sonas system. However, the original quote was less than the final invoice due to the time-lapse between the first fix and completion – the labour and equipment had increased in price. The quote was valid for 30 days only, lesson learned.  The building material costs were higher too, despite having a breakdown of these costs from the supplier which our budget spreadsheet was based upon. Generally, the majority of people under-estimate their expenditure.

With the uncertainty of property the market, and the impact Brexit may have, many home owners are opting to improve their current home instead of moving. Having had nearly forty years experience in renovating properties, although home values may dip from time to time, they always go up, and on the whole a good investment.

If you think I can be of benefit to you and your project, whether big or small just contact me.

Floor tiles on cloakroom floor     http://www.firedearth.com/tiles/range/patisserie/sucre-1 and entrance floor  http://www.firedearth.com/tiles/range/casino-floor/mode/grid

Artwork by Kim Major George  http://www.majorgeorge.co.uk/

 

 

Deck The Halls -Christmas Decorating Ideas

A welcoming Christmas entrance hall

A Christmas welcome

 

 

 

Deck the halls with boughs of holly…. as the Christmas Carol says; a tradition which goes back to medieval times and continues today. Either combined with ivy, fir, cinnamon sticks and baubles are made into garlands, hung from stair banisters’ and fireplaces or simply draped over pictures and mirrors.

 

Wreaths – Traditionally hung on front doors, but look equally as festive hung on a wall inside, perhaps in place of a picture during Christmas. A simple willow wreath or zinc with lights will brighten a dark corner.

Focal Points

The Christmas Tree is usually the focal point in a room, especially if you don’t have a fireplace – but do measure the size you require prior to purchasing; trees have a knack of looking smaller in a shop than in your sitting room!

Decorating your tree is personal preference of course, and can lead to disagreements on occasion.  Sometimes people have two trees to avoid differences of opinion!  Choosing  from traditional, contemporary, Nordic, and Vintage themes.  The choice of decorations available is endless, so too are the choice of lights. Your tree should reflect your personality and creative ability, however just ensure that it complements the rooms’ surroundings rather than compete with it, to do both justice.

Fireplaces and Hearths – With traditional fireplace with a mantle and surround the choices are limitless. Greenery, candles, cones, ornaments. Again, choose decorations, colours and design which complement the fire surround and your room to create an overall cohesive design.

A faux fireplace decorated for Christmas

A faux fireplace decorated for Christmas

A stunning arrangement of lights candles and stars

A simple arrangement of lights candles and stars is easy to do.

A collection of a woodland theme on a hearth for Christmas

A collection on a theme looks festive

Candles in a hearth to imitate a real fire

Candles replace the glow of a real fire to great effect

Candles and greenery for an effective hearth arrangement

Simple greenery with candles which will reflect in the mirror

Countrystyle hearth and decor

Countrystyle hearth and decoration wwwwhitecompany.com

It’s advisable to have a faux garland near a wood burner or multi fuel stove, due to the heat output, if you want your ‘greenery’ to look fresh for the Christmas period. Led lights woven through and baubles can be added to enhance your garland. Or have a garland made from dried fruit and foliage. Keep the look simple with piles of logs for a rustic appeal.

A faux garland for a multi fuel stove works best

It’s advisable to use a faux garland near a stove. House to Home.com

Floral displays as table centre pieces, again with candles look stunning. However, ensure the arrangement is not too tall to block out the person sitting opposite (you may find this a bonus though!) and is easily removed if requiring the space for serving dishes. A floral display on occasional tables looks stunning too, but if time is at a premium or not your thing, try grouping three of the same plants together for effect like Poinsettia or Hellebores’ ( Christmas Rose).

Exteriors – You’ve all seen the extravagant light displays some homes have at Christmas, sometimes complete with a Santa on the roof! If your taste is somewhat less flamboyant (I know mine is) then less can be more. Fairy lights hung around the front porch or small trees by the door give a warm festive welcome. If locating a suitable electrical point is difficult, place lanterns outside with LED tea lights or candles instead. A wreath or a simple bunch of evergreen tied with a festive bow hung on the door.

Christmas front entrance idea

A festive front entrance from House to Home

An evergreen Christmas door wreath

An evergreen wreath always makes a Christmas

Greenery in urn with lantern and sculpture

An unusual compilation of greenery, lantern and sculpture prettypinktulips.com

Rusted star lanterns from Cox and Cox

Rusted star lanterns from Cox and Cox

Whatever your Christmas  decorating choice – let your personality and ideas shine.

Wishing you all a very Happy Christmas.

Images fairytaillightsandfun.com royal collection.org.uk www.busybeestudio.co.uk next.co.uk iheartshabbychic.com sarahgordonhome.co.uk  Sarah Raven sjarmerendejul.blogspot.com inspirationsdeco.blogspot.fr

Renovation and Restoration of a 1930’s House (15 ) Getting Plastered!

The garden path being laid down the garden

The path being laid down the garden

Each trade moves projects forward, but when the plasterers arrive with their skill ( along with the mess) covering the walls, suddenly rooms begin to take shape. Our plasterers have also rendered round the exterior windows, doors and block work. Once completed and dry, we were itching to stabilize and then paint the render, to tidy up the exterior a little after looking so sad for so long. This won’t be fully completed until the side boiler/ mud room, porch and garage have been finished.

Once the plaster was dry the walls were ready to be painted with a ‘mist’ coat, this being a watered down trade white emulsion. Applying this base coat to new plastered walls will save on the finished emulsion paint coat required due to the porousness of bare plaster. It also shows up imperfections in the plaster which can be filled and sanded if necessary, leaving a smooth even surface for the final coats of your chosen colour. Also, if having metal light sockets and switches, the base mist coat will prevent moisture transgressing and causing discolouration  after the second fix electrics. The house suddenly became lighter and brighter. The ceilings had two coats of their final colour  but just one coat on the walls as the skirting boards have yet to be fixed in some rooms. I would wait for the comments from the different trades as they viewed my chosen colours’ being applied, which is mainly a neutral palette of soft greys. “What colour  do you call that”? They would ask. “Corpse Dick” I would reply. Taken aback I explained and showed them my niece’s comedy sketch about Farrow and Ball   http://www.farrow-ball.com/colours/paint/fcp-category/list and interior designers. https://sinteriors.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=161087&action=edit

Other colours chosen to prevent the house from appearing too bland are similar to the popular choices from the 1930s’, which I found under the layers of wallpaper and can be bought from many paint companies.

Craig and Rose available at B and Q, Crown, Dulux, Little Greene Paint, Fired Earth, and of course Farrow and Ball, to name a few. One of which was called ‘Fresh Plaster,’ from Craig and Rose, which of course caused amusement and comments from the plasterers. I have used this colour in a north – facing room as it’s a warm colour. Remember, ceilings do not have to be white. In some cases this can cause the wall colour to look different than you intended. The ceiling can be painted the same colour as the walls, giving the appearance of a higher ceiling. This also makes the cutting in (where the walls meet the ceiling) a lot easier. If you have a hall or landing with a lot of doors, which don’t have any architectural appeal, by painting the same colour as the walls the appearance is less like a corridor because the doors blend into the walls. This is a popular current trend, but ensure that an eggshell, or paint specifically for woodwork finish is used and available in the same colour as the emulsion  Not all paint manufacturers produce all finishes in all colours’.

My biggest painting challenge was the Master Bedroom with its high vaulted ceiling. I had to climb a ladder onto a tower to enable me to reach the ceiling with the roller. I then had to climb down and ask someone strong to move the tower along a little, only to climb up again and paint the next area of ceiling. Progress was slow, over several days, but who needs a gym with all that exercise? Being such a large room I needed gallons of paint and good natural day light as the electrics had not yet been connected. Once completed and the paint dry, some of the walls appeared to be patchy and slightly different colours. This was due to different batches of paint of the same colour, despite my order for all the paint made at the same time. The only way to rectify this was to repaint the wall with a final coat of the same batch number paint. I must say I was very relieved to escape this room and move onto the next!

A tower used to reach the ceiling

A tower used to reach the ceiling

Our neighbour came round one afternoon, concerned about the fence boandary  and his hedge, wishing to see how we had dealt with it, since laying our new garden path alongside the boundary. The ancient, now rusted wire fence and remains of the wooden posts – hidden for decades behind over grown shrubs and trees was still there, where it had always been. He wanted to ensure that we knew where his boundary was, up to the remains of wire fence, and that the hedge was his. The wooden fence, such as it was and what remained of it was rotten and leaning inwards towards our garden due to his overgrown hedge and would need to be cut back before a new fence could be erected ( by us). This was pointed out to him, but he didn’t cut it back, he said ” as it didn’t effect him”. So we cut out the problem branches and returned the debris as it belonged to him, and our skip was already full.

In the main sitting room the new fireplace wall was divided into three equal sections. The centre section being left as bare plaster ready for the bricks which would be laid behind the multi- fuel stove. The two side sections were painted in. This was a compromise to the completed brick wall. Great discussions on the final design of the fireplace ensued. The finished height of the hearth ( so logs could be stored underneath) and the size of the multi fuel stove. Due to the volume of the room we only required a stove with a 5 kW out put, to avoid cooking ourselves. However, we wondered if the size of the stove would look too small in the room. Pencil mark measurements were made on the plaster and we painted a ‘stove’ in situ to visualise the space. The original quote we received from a company we had used before was very high, not due to the stove itself, but for the building of the hearth with a granite top and flue installation. They were not forthcoming or helpful when I explained I just wanted the stove and flue installed. Our builders are very caperble of building the hearth design with bricks, and making the hearth from cast concrete. This was the finished look I wanted to achieve. The hearth was constructed in a wooden frame and strengthened with steel wire. Coloured concrete was poured into the frame and left to set. Once dried and set it was removed from the frame and lifted into place by four men and secured. It looks amazing and was achieved at a fraction of the cost of granite. We sourced the multi fuel stove and flu from another company and installed by approved fitters. The long established installers thought the hearth was solid York Stone and couldn’t believe it was cast concrete.

The company who made our steel lintels also make a small selection of iron work railings,  and made to measure the Juliete balcony for the Master Bedroom. I was glad once they had installed this, so I could open the French doors and let some fresh air in and finish off the rear elevation.

Renovation and Restoration of a 1930’s House. (12) From Plans to Execution

Despite having every conceivable weather thrown at the builders – snow, frost, sunshine and heavy rain, the house has grown and is beginning to take shape. It’s such a thrill to see the rooms form, from what has until now, just been ideas, sketches and Architects drawings and plans. We have now nearly reached 2nd floor joist level, so all very exciting!

My husband and I agreed to disagree, on the internal brick wall, and have compromised on a brick ‘chimney’ breast’. This will act as a grid line behind the wood burning stove as a focal point in the the room, and to create a cohesive link with the original brick fireplace remaining in the sitting room. This will be built after the walls have been plastered. The log burner will have an external flue, so the bricks are purely aesthetic. A raised hearth will also be built for the stove to sit on, and to be seen from across the room, not hidden from site by a coffee table.

Replacement Aluminium Replacement Windows  The Heritage Window Company

Replacement Aluminium Replacement Windows The Heritage Window Company

We will shortly be placing our order for the windows. We have decided on the design and material and have received quotes from a couple of companies. I requested a local company who I have used before to see a sample at his showroom. An online brochure is O.K. for all the technical information and design, but to actually view the windows first hand is important, and you are spending a lot of money. If you were buying a car, you would certainly want to view it. The owner of the window company explained he did not have a sample window because they source the windows from a manufacturer, they only install the windows and issue the FENSA certificate. His supplier of the windows insist he purchase a window to display in his showroom, and suggested that I visited the manufacturers showroom in Canvey Island. This is not going to happen, I’m not traipsing miles – sorry. This may lose him the order. I rang the manufacturer to explain the problem. They told me that after three orders of the windows the installation company get a refund for the product. Personally I feel the window installer and manufacturer should strike a deal which will ultimately be beneficial to more sales. If you haven’t got the window on display, how are you going to promote the sale of it?  But then I’m not Mary Portas!  http://www.channel4.com/programmes/mary-portas-secret-shopper  As with most builds the windows and glass hold up new builds and renovations because they won’t make the windows until the apertures have been built in case they don’t fit. My builder says that if the windows are made to the drawing dimensions then they should fit, if not he will adjust the aperture to make them fit. (He didn’t put it quite as politely as this!). Perhaps window companies could offer a disclaimer for signature –  or is this a legal minefield? So we will have to wait for the windows like everyone else.

I'm going to attempt to renovate these doors

I’m going to attempt to renovate these doors

As explained in an earlier blog we are trying to re- use and recycle as many materials as possible. Roof tiles from the now demolished garage roof and lean to will be used on the roof of the extension, which will also help to blend the new and old, avoiding obvious new roof lines. Renovating the original doors, and saving some of the wood from the timber floors for a cloaks rack to be made later on. This will save money, as well as being conscious of the impact on the environment. We would have liked to install solar panels, and  perhaps an air source heat pump, but the initial costs of installation are prohibitive, even with Government schemes. We are ultimately re-cycling the whole house, which was uninhabitable. Very environmentally friendly. It’s a pity the Government won’t recognize the value of the millions of people doing the same to their properties and axe the VAT on these renovation projects. The VAT saved could then be used to install new technologies to reduce carbon emissions. Eraze the property to the ground, even if it is structurally sound, use more materials and resources and do it VAT free, saving yourself 20% without having to install many sustainable and renewable energy technologies. There was a Code for Sustainable Homes, now scrapped  https://www.gov.uk/government/news/stephen-williams-announces-plans-to-raise-housing-standards which gave instructions and guidelines to builders and some local authorities, depending on area.

Small, simple changes can make a huge difference to utility bills and the environment though for instance:-

Changing your light bulbs to LED bulbs. Whilst more expensive initially, will ultimately save on your electricity bill.

Install water butts fitted to gutter down pipes for watering the garden.

If you have outside space, install a washing line to dry clothes.

Fit showers with aerated heads. These mix air with water, thus giving a good shower, but using less water.

To install a cistern, which again uses less water. 3 and 6 litre cisterns, dual fuel flush to WRAS regulations.

Purchase high grade energy rated electrical goods. AA being the highest.

The rear garden, like all gardens during major building works has been battered by a digger and dumper. Wearing wellies is a necessity.. The earth has been leveled and a crushed concrete base has been laid ready for the paving slabs for the path and sitting area at the bottom of the garden as per landscape plan.  This has been done now so access for carrying heavy materials is easier. Once the side ‘mud come boiler room’ is built it will be far more difficult to transport the materials to the rear garden.  Thinking and planning ahead is sensible, but sometimes one can forget the obvious small things when looking at the bigger picture, like an outside tap or an provision of an exterior electric point.

Renovation and Restoration of a 1930’s House (11) – Compromises with Budget and Design

Compromised by the weather

Compromised by the weather

The Party Wall Award was signed and sealed on Friday 22nd January, which was a relief as the digger was due for delivery on the following Monday ready to dig the footings. The building inspector had been booked for late on Tuesday morning to inspect and hopefully pass the excavations, in time for the concrete to arrive and commence pouring from twelve noon onwards to fill the same. So thankfully our deadline and schedule went according to plan. It was very exciting to watch the footings being dug, a major landmark on the project, and to see what had just been until now on drawings. This week the beam and block floors on the extension and garage are being laid, ready for the next stage.

However, we are in need of a good carpenter to construct the roof beams. One recommended carpenter is too busy, and another has fallen out with our builder over a prior job for some reason, and refuses to work on the same site. Running any project requires diplomatic, political and communication skills! There is a shortage of skilled trades people, especially reliable ones who don’t disappear int the middle of your job to start another one, and leave you at a standstill. To have your workers on site everyday, solely working on your build is brilliant and the work moves consistently forward. The phrase ‘Hospital job’ is occasionally mentioned, whereby your work can be perceived as a ‘fill in’ when other jobs take priority. This can be costly, time consuming and frustrating. A written, signed agreement is recommended and perhaps a penalty clause added whereby the builder is fined if not finished at the pre agreed date.This is quite normal with the larger building companies. Smaller individual trades people will normally provide a written quote, with a fixed price but allow for ‘unknowns’ such as repairs to walls when tiles have been removed. There is no way of telling if the wall will come away with the tiles or not, therefore if full repair to the wall is required this will obviously be more expensive than if the wall is O.K. and the price is adjusted accordingly by prior agreement. I avoid ‘day rate’ pricing, unless how many days the job will take is given in writing.  Otherwise you have no control over the cost or time to complete the work.

Some quotes have been slow in being returned, and now have to be chased. It is best to allow for the ‘benefit of doubt’. Emails or post gone astray, which invariably happens, but once confirmed that all the necessary information has been received and given a few weeks to return the quote, I follow up with a phone call. I will not chase or contact again, as I feel that if I’m chasing them, when trying to give them work, what service will I receive once they have my work?

Choosing tiles from large DIY retailers has been difficult and disappointing, I had hoped for some possible sale bargains. End of line or to be discontinued tiles can be a good source of  savings. Just ensure you buy enough for the intended job, allowing 10% for breakages and wastage. Nothing is more irritating than running out, and desperately hunting, or unable to get any more. Insufficient quantities of tiles of choice were available, and the new lines for 2015 would not be on the shelves until sometime in February, so no joy as yet. Tile specialist shops are my next port of call. I don’t know about you, but I couldn’t just buy the tile online without actually seeing and feeling it, as colour representations aren’t always accurate. You can often order tile samples, which helps with online purchasing.  The same goes for wallpaper too, and check the batch numbers. I have been luckier buying curtains in the January sales though. My husband thinks I’m nuts buying curtains before we have any actual building or windows. But if you have your window sizes and add 10cm cm below the cill and 10   cm above the window for the rail. Add at least 10cm to the width of each curtain to allow for the rod overhang at each end. This guide for a basic pair of curtains and if you know what colours’ and design you need for each room, then it saves time, and money when you are ready to hang them. If you are planning more elaborate or complicated window dressings, and are unsure at this stage what type of rail you will have, then it is best to wait until you have decided.

Curtain rail positions

If you are confident to buy curtains prior to the rooms completion, then do so. otherwise wait until you are sure where the rail or fixings will be hung, to avoid errors.

Ideally I wanted to have one wall (the wall behind the wood burning stove) in the sitting room built in bricks. The idea being it would create a slight industrial vibe, add texture and link the original brick fireplace in the existing sitting room. There are thousands of different bricks available, salvaged bricks from previous buildings are a great eco recycling option, but are  invariably more expensive due to the labour content of removing the old mortar stuck to the brick. Unfortunately, we couldn’t use the bricks from the demolished garage or side lean to, because the bricks had been rendered on the outside, and painted on the inside. We have used some of these as a hardcore base for the terrace to be built much later on. To match the brick as near as possible to the fireplace I took some photo’s to compare with the bricks on display at a builders merchant. I have narrowed it down to one brick, isn’t that amazing? Bricks are priced by the thousand. I need  a 1000 bricks, which included 5% wastage for one wall. The cost of the bricks is £895.00 per thousand. Plus the cost of labour and mortar, so for one wall it would cost £ 1200.00.  A price comparison to a block work wall, mortar, labour, plaster and plaster and paint finish would be approximately the same. If you feel that  a whole wall of bricks would be too over powering in the room, then try adapting your initial idea to suit. Perhaps just a brick chimney breast  would suffice. In my case it won’t as I will not have a chimney breast, just a flue pipe from the stove up the wall and outside. A wall paper imitating bricks could be a solution, or perhaps just a raised brick hearth would be a compromise. My original design thought was to have a raised hearth, sufficiently high enough to allow for wood to be stored below the hearth and the stove raised enough to actually see it across the room, without being hidden from view by a coffee table.  In which case bricks would not really work. A cast concrete, slate or granite plinth (hearth) placed on the same, would work. House renovation, I have found is often one of compromise, not only due to budgets and designs, but with partners too!

All images other than my own are from Pinterest.

Renovation and Restoration of a 1930’s House (10) It gets Worse Before it Gets Better

A lonely, empty and neglected house.

A lonely, empty and neglected house.

 

Since the builders arrived on 8th January, the house has changed dramatically. The side lean to housing the old boiler has been demolished, as has the garage. The roof tiles being removed first and stored safely for re-use elsewhere. One chimney stack has been removed and the roof reinstated using the old tiles from the lean to.

 

The wooden floor in the old dining room has been removed and the wood stacked in the sitting room for re-use where possible. The original internal doors have been taken off and also stored in the sitting room for re-use. These doors will need a lot of preparation prior to painting, and the handles will need restoring too, as I feel it’s important to re-use and re-cycle where possible and to retain the integrity of the house to use fixtures, fittings and finishings that enhance the existing architectural details, but are still functional. It may not save you much money on your materials bill when you equate the labour hours spent, but you can do it yourself to make savings. Original skirting boards and picture rails had been carefully taken off and stored before the walls were removed, also to be re-instated in some rooms of the original house after the plastering has been carried out. This has caused interesting comments from builders – basically they think the picture rails should go!

Flooring and doors stored for re-use

Flooring and doors stored for re-use

The chimney breast has been knocked out. Easy to say, and not so easy to do. There were masses of bricks and was solid as a rock! The existing wall between the kitchen and dining room has gone too. So we are left with one large space and a beam and block floor, which is ready for the insulation, damp proofing, underfloor heating and concrete to be laid upon. Some of the hall/ dining room wall has also gone, with a lintel in place ready for (much later on) our glass petition wall and door. Block work  has been laid to form a new wall and doorway into, what will be a cloak room. It is a challenge getting to the kettle which is perched on what was a shelf in the pantry ( also gone) to switch it on for tea. That is, after filling the kettle from a small water pipe on the other side of the ‘kitchen’. The rusty old sink is in the skip. Hence no one wants to make the tea!

The walls dividing the airing cupboard, bathroom, toilet and corridor have been take down leaving one huge space upstairs. The dividing brick wall between the two bedrooms was removed because it was only sitting on the floorboards and not a supporting wall. By replacing the wall with stud work (wooden frame, insulation and plaster board) it will be lighter, making a steel beam below unnecessary.

A huge pile of rubble from all the masonary removal was piled in the front garden, some has been crushed and flattened to avoid a ‘mud bath’ and the rear garden looks like the Battle of the Somme. A deep hole has been dug for the soakaway, with earth piled up in mounds all along the sides. Some of the crushed bricks and mortar will be used as a hardcore base for the terrace. Somehow our past efforts with the weed killer look quite feeble and perhaps unnecessary.

The builders have been working on the internal structure work, which needs doing whilst waiting for our neighbours surveyor to complete the Party Wall Agreement. However, we would like to commence digging the footings this week, but can’t until the Agreement is signed. I’m concerned that this is going to hold up our progress. I’m chasing all parties hard.

I have found some information which maybe of help if your planning you’re own self build or renovation project, if you didn’t already know that Jewsons (among other suppliers) offer a pricing service for the project and list all the materials required with their prices. If Jewsons don’t supply a particular material they still include in it a market price. These prices can be compared to other suppliers prices to get the best deal. They charge £180.00 plus vat for this service and I think well worth the money.

Plant hire can be difficult for self builders, due to the insurance policy required to cover the plant. Jewsons also offer self build insurance which covers plant hire too. They have recognized the growing market of self build and home renovations. But as stated before, shop around for insurance cover and be sure to read the small print!